Childhood · Nostalgia

Creating Cows and Other Whimsical Things

File_000 (6)

See that happy little cow up there? Isn’t there something so whimsical, wonderful, and nostalgic about her?

That cow is the creation of my 5-year-old daughter, Zoey. She loves art so much that she regularly watches Bob Ross, adds things in to her drawings to make them feel “more balanced,” and dreams of owning her own art gallery.

File_000 (7)While one of her most favorite things is a blank canvas or sheet of paper, one of mine is watching the process of how she creates. The reason? She doesn’t think too much about what she’s doing—she lets her heart guide her hands. It’s such a beautiful thing, the way she fills that white space with whatever she wants, not worrying that things need to be perfect. I love this about her, and I think most children create their artwork in the same fashion.

But then we grow up, and somewhere along the way we let our hearts guide us a little less, not only in the things we create, but in the other things we do as well. As a graphic designer, I’ve had years of experience of trying how to make something look just right. And as an adult, I’ve also had plenty of experience in doing logical, rational things, trying to ensure that things end up the way they are “supposed” to be—carefully coloring within the lines. But as the events of the past year proved, maybe that really wasn’t the best plan of attack…

Starting this blog was my version of a blank page, my version of putting a bow on the top of a cow chewing her happy, little flower in a magical, colorful world. This wonderful new creative process makes me feel like that picture of Zoey up there.

So. Darn. Excited.

Now, more than ever, I think it’s time we all start creating curious cows and other wonderful, whimsical things. It’s time we start coloring outside the lines a little bit. It’s time we let our passionate hearts start guiding us again. It’s time we get rid of the ruled pages and maybe try some blank ones instead. Because you never know: they might just end up holding your best masterpiece yet.

post-end-icon-teal

At the Nostalgia Diaries, our goal is to help you simplify, enhance, and engage your lives by focusing on the most important things: remembering, appreciating, believing, and becoming. It’s all about celebrating the past to create better days today.

We’d love for you to join us in this journey.

P.S. Don’t forget to follow our colorful, creative spaces on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. We’re fun and happy and whimsical and nostalgic over there, too. Pinky swear.

54 thoughts on “Creating Cows and Other Whimsical Things

  1. Wonderful – it reminded me of Ermintrude of The Magic Roundabout. She’s drawn in a completely different graphic style but has the same retro sensibility. You just know they’re going to caper around, given half a chance!

  2. This is so great! I love it! I have quite a few similar whimsical art pieces by my kids that are framed and I love looking back at them.

  3. What a profound post. It is so true we lose a little of our non-thinking creativity as we age! I’m glad you found your outlet! My four-year-old son loves art too & I can honestly say, your daughter’s drawing is great!

  4. I love kids so much. They are so inspiring because they aren’t afraid to just be who they are. That is the happiest cow I’ve ever seen, and it makes me happy too. Thank you for this reminder to give myself the freedom to create my own whimsical cow.

  5. First off, I love the cow. He looks so colourful and happy. I grew up on a farm and really do love cows as for the most part they are gentle creatures.

    And you are so right about adults getting stuck on perfection. I help people write books and one of my favourite ways to explain the process is, “Write like a child; edit like an adult.” Too many people get stuck in perfection the the creative process is messy and beautiful.

  6. This is cute, it made me smile just reading about it. My little girl love coloring and it’s surprising sometimes what they can at their age.

Leave a Reply